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100 years of Pond Laboratory

The Pond Laboratory started with the Sparks Administration (1908-1920). President Sparks purchased an additional 600 acres to add to the original 400 acres which allowed the construction of new buildings. The first phases of the Chemistry Building (now known as Pond Laboratory) were one of those new additions.  But, due to financial constraints construction was delayed. Governor John K. Tener (1911-15) was instrumental in winning legislative approval for an appropriation of more than $1.2 million to Penn State for 1913-15. Some of the funds were used to construct the chemistry laboratory (Pond Laboratory), which was opened in 1917. During Ralph Dorn Hetzel’s presidency in the late 1920’s brought about financial growth which allowed for additions to Pond Lab to be performed. The building as it stands in this photo (Top Left- circa 1922) represents the lower left-hand leg of what will eventually be an H-shaped structural group. The building followed the style of architecture that was already started on the campus.

In 1888 George Gilbert Pond, a graduate of Amherst College and the University of Gottingen, arrived to assume the duties of professor of chemistry and head of the department. Pond, who would go on to become a legendary figure at Penn State proceeded to reorganize the chemistry course. Although enrollments remained modest, Pond's high standards drew enough students to the chemistry course (about twenty or so every year) to make it for many years the most popular of the non-engineering courses. Dr. George Gilbert Pond, Dean of the School of Natural Science and Professor of Chemistry passed away on June 13, 1920. The day after his death on June 14, 1920 the Board of Trustees voted to change the name of the Priestley Chemical Laboratories to the George Gilbert Pond Chemical Laboratories. Dr. Pond served the University from October, 1888 until May, 1920.

By 1930, Pond Laboratory had grown to about three times its original size (bottom left). The additions perfectly match the original building. The building houses laboratories and offices. The building is also the headquarters to World in Conversation. In the early 1990’s Pond lab became the home for the Computer Science Department. Then in the early 2000’s the Department of Political Science moved to Pond. And this is how the Pond Lab is known today, as the saying goes, “the rest is history”.             

 

Here are some related links to learn more:

https://books.google.com/books?id=rbTADAAAQBAJ&pg=PA1921&lpg=PA1921&dq=Pond+Laboratory,+Penn+State+University&source=bl&ots=LxX_BXGDon&sig=rv2mUlQWMEDpsyQrPme5kAFA_pQ&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiF_tveyovfAhUt11kKHedcDfg4FBDoATABegQIARAB#v=onepage&q=Pond%20Laboratory%2C%20Penn%20State%20University&f=false

https://books.google.com/books?id=oyFGAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA339&lpg=PA339&dq=Pond+Laboratory,+Penn+State+University&source=bl&ots=sGrYeMbkLi&sig=kUZQwf2-eE0Ied7tCDZCDg5yOiE&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiF_tveyovfAhUt11kKHedcDfg4FBDoATADegQIBxAB#v=onepage&q=Pond%20Laboratory%2C%20Penn%20State%20University&f=false

https://libraries.psu.edu/about/collections/penn-state-university-park-campus-history-collection/history-university-park

Banaszak named to Commission to find fair redistricting solutions

Governor Tom Wolf is taking action to build on the bipartisan support for making Pennsylvania’s redistricting process more fair and nonpartisan. The governor signed an executive order today establishing the bipartisan Pennsylvania Redistricting Reform Commission. Lee Ann Banaszak, Department Head and Professor of Political Science, has been named one of the 15 members to serve the commission to find fair redistricting solutions. 

https://www.wearecentralpa.com/news/psu-professor-to-help-with-congressional-map/1641886526

https://www.governor.pa.gov/governor-wolf-creates-commission-find-fair-redistricting-solutions/

Political Science graduate student, Chuyu Liu, is a multiple award winner

Political Science graduate student, Chuyu Liu, is a multiple award winner

Ph.D. candidate, Chuyu Liu, has received 2017-2018 Robert S. Friedman Award for Excellence in Teaching, 2018 RGSO Dissertation Support Award which provides financial support of research-related expenditures associated with a dissertation, and 2017-2018 Outstanding Political Science Graduate Student Award. His research is published or forthcoming in Energy Policy, International Studies Quarterly, Journal of East Asian Studies, Security Studies, and The China Review. He is a Ph.D. candidate in Political Science. He studies international relations, with a special focus on ethnic conflict, domestic terrorism, and East-Asian security.  He has applied a variety of methods, including experiment, game theory, qualitative archival work, and statistical analysis in his work.

Matthew J. Denny wins the Poster Award at the Penn State Graduate Exhibition, 2018

Matthew J. Denny wins the Poster Award at the Penn State Graduate Exhibition, 2018

Ph.D. candidate, Matthew Denny won 2018 Penn State Graduate Exhibition Poster Award. Forty-one graduate students received awards for their research and creative scholarship in the 33rd Annual Graduate Exhibition, held March 23 and 25 on Penn State's University Park campus. More than 220 graduate students participated in the 2018 Graduate Exhibition which included 214 graduate student participants in the research poster presentation option.

http://gradschool.psu.edu/exhibition/awards/?mobileFormat=false#researc

 

Giovanni Castro wins the 2018-2019 American Political Science Association Minority Fellowship Award

Giovanni Castro wins the 2018-2019 American Political Science Association Minority Fellowship Award

Graduate student, Giovanni Castro, won the American Political Science Association Minority Fellowship Award for 2018-2018. The Minority Fellows Program (MFP) is a fellowship competition for individuals from underrepresented backgrounds applying to or in the early stages of doctoral programs in political science. The MFP was established in 1969 (originally as the Black Graduate Fellowship) to increase the number of minority scholars in the discipline. Since its inception, the APSA MFP has designated more than 500 fellows and contributed to the successful completion of doctoral political science programs for over 100 individuals. Each year, APSA awards up to 12 funded fellowships in the amount of $4,000. Recently, APSA introduced a new spring round of the MFP awards for graduate students in the pre-dissertation stage of their career. This year the spring cycle MFP awards are available in the form of a one-time award ranging between $500-$1500 (depending upon funding availability), to support expenses related to PhD graduate study for first and second year political science PhD students from underrepresented groups. 

https://www.apsanet.org/mfp/current-recipients