Current Students

Still looking for a summer session course? Here are four interesting options– all have room for additional students!- 4/22/2020 Maymester International Political Economy, PLSC-412 (MTWRF 10:15-12:15) Professor Aubrey Waddick We all know that countries trade with each other, but do you know why they choose to trade? Do you wonder how international economic deals are made, or what the U.S.- China trade dispute is all about? Are you interested in exploring the global economic impact of Covid-19? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then PLSC-412 may be the right class for you. International Political Economy is a course designed to give students a conceptual and empirical overview of key topics in this interdisciplinary field. Broadly, it covers issues related to globalization, trade, investment, immigration, finance, and aid. More specifically, we will consider the intersection between the international economic system and political outcomes like civil conflict, immigration policy, and democratization. We will also investigate the political-economic origins and implication of contemporary issues like the U.S-China Trade War, the COVD-19 Pandemic, and the rise of China as an economic super-power. Overall, this course is designed to develop students’ writing and analytical skills in assessing and explaining international political and economic events. PLSC-412 satisfies the international relations distribution requirement, the requirement for a political science course above the 400-level, and the related course requirement for B.A. majors in political science. It fulfills the requirement for a political science course at the 400-level, and the related course requirement for B.S. majors in political science. It also fulfills the advanced course requirement, and the requirement for a course at the 400-level for International Politics majors. First Session Dictators and Their Demise, PLSC-414 (MTWRF 11:10-12:25) Professor Rosemary Pang This course examines the politics of non-democratic countries: the conditions that give rise to authoritarianism; the variety of authoritarian regimes; the strategies authoritarian leaders use to retain power; the of different forms of authoritarianism for economic growth and human development; and the domestic and international sources of authoritarian demise. The course covers current and historical cases of authoritarian rule in Mexico, China, Dominican Republic, North Korea, Chile, and the former Zaire (now Democratic Republic of Congo). By the end of the course, students should form an understanding of different types of authoritarian rule, and how common foreign policy tools, such as economic sanctions, foreign aid, human rights shaming, can affect domestic politics in these countries. PLSC-414 satisfies the international relations distribution requirement, the requirement for a political science course above the 400-level, and the related course requirement for B.A. majors in political science. It fulfills the requirement for a political science course at the 400-level, and the related course requirement for B.S. majors in political science. It also fulfills the requirement for a course at the 400-level for International Politics majors. First Session Political Opinion, PLSC-427 (MTWRF 9:35-10:50) Professor Joseph Phillips Every day, we’re bombarded by claims about why public opinion is the way it is. But what exactly is public opinion? How do we go from the feelings and thoughts about politics in people’s heads to the poll results we see on television? Where do these thoughts and feelings even come from? And do politicians listen to our voices when crafting policy? This semester, we’ll embark on a journey to understand public opinion’s origins, measurement, and consequences. PLSC-427 satisfies the American politics distribution requirement, the requirement for a political science course above the 400-level, and the related course requirement for B.A. majors in political science. It fulfills the requirement for a political science course at the 400-level, and the related course requirement for B.S. majors in political science. Second Session Comparing Politics Around the Globe, PLSC-3 (MTWRF 11:10-12:25) Professor Boyoon Lee What is the state and where did it come from? What is democracy? Why are some countries democracies whereas others are dictatorships? Does the kind of regime a country has affect the prosperity and well-being of its citizens? Why are ethnic groups politicized in some countries but not in others? Why do some countries have many parties where as some have only a few? How do governments form, and what determines the type of government that takes office? What are the material and normative implications associated with different types of government? This course examines politics around the world in a comparative context, not only to broaden our knowledge about other countries but to make a systematic comparison to test claims made about the political events around the world. To do this, we will explore theoretical arguments to real-world problems such as above and evaluate the explanations for their logical consistency and empirical accuracy. Along the way, we will learn about differences and similarities among countries and a range of approaches to analyzing the political world. At the end of the course, students will be able to understand and discuss political phenomena, drawing on existing claims provided in the class. PLSC-3 satisfies the comparative politics distribution requirement and the requirement for a political science course below the 400-level for B.A. majors in political science. It fulfills the requirement for an introductory political science course for both B.S. majors in political science and International Politics majors.

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